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Goal: 30,000 Progress: 13,869
Sponsored by: The Veterans Site

Combat PTSD.

You've seen those words before, on news tickers, in Hollywood films, on trending tabs, even on the covers of scientific journals. You've been seeing those words for years now, haven't you?

What you may not have seen, or heard, is that Combat PTSD is the leading contributor to a staggering number: twenty-two. Twenty-two. According to a study conducted by Veterans Affairs in 2013, twenty-two United States veterans commit suicide every day.

Since the 2013 study, no study has found the suicide rate to be declining. Which means that we aren't doing a good enough job for our veterans. To combat this trend, the VA needs to change and improve. Quite simply, the programs currently offered by the VA-- including medication, psychotherapy and group therapy-- are not what every veteran currently needs. There cannot be a one-size-fits-all model to treat Combat PTSD.

Combat PTSD is both a psychological and physiological condition. The stress put on the sufferer's brain actually changes its physical landscape, including a 5-10% decrease in gray matter, the part of the brain responsible for relaying neurological messages to and from the body. Also affected are the hippocampus (short-term memory) and the prefrontal cortex (emotional response).

What if there were ways to not only repair what has been lost, but ways that our veterans could find peace? What if, instead of a telephone hotline and a refillable orange bottle, there were programs that granted them access to garden spaces, and to the arts, and to exercise therapy like yoga or running? What if there was a way to save veterans' lives?

Sign the petition below to tell Secretary of Veteran Affairs to explore other options to treat Combat PTSD.

Sign Here






Dear Secretary of Veteran Affairs,

According to a study conducted by Veterans Affairs in 2013, twenty-two United States veterans commit suicide every day. Twenty-two. Considering that there are now more programs for suffering veterans than there ever have been, it's hard to believe that Combat PTSD is still the leading factor that drives veterans to suicide. Together, we need to make a change. We should start with where the most veterans go for help: the VA.

The problem is not that the VA doesn't offer help; the problem is that the programs currently offered by the VA are not what every veteran needs. The VA's programs that address Combat PTSD – including medication, psychotherapy and group therapy– may work for some returning service members. For others, though, the current model just doesn't work.

Some veterans instead need something like Yoga Warriors International, who has had success in 'retraining the fight-or-flight response' so that when confronting a situation that triggers their memories, they’re able to remain calm.

Others may need the physical act of running, which a study done at Cambridge University reported to grow gray matter, a crucial part of the brain that can sometimes decrease with the onset of Combat PTSD.

Some veterans may need the catharsis that can come from writing, painting, or playing a piece of music. Others may need something like Veterans Healing Farm, where veterans escape the noisy world and are allowed to put their hands in the soil they fought so hard to defend.

Having the VA act as a bridge to these programs would be beneficial, but think about if the VA offered these programs. Veterans could be excited to go to the VA. Veterans could excited to go to therapy. Peace could be found. Pride could be restored. Progress toward having that 'twenty-two' become “zero” could be jumpstarted by the VA’s efforts to revitalize the offered programs to treat Combat PTSD.

Thank you.

Sincerely,

Petition Signatures


May 23, 2018 Kelly Shanks
May 23, 2018 Kathy Jones
May 22, 2018 Lynn Ronconi
May 22, 2018 Sherry McCormick
May 22, 2018 Aliyah Khan
May 22, 2018 Ann Erbacher Grey
May 21, 2018 (Name not displayed)
May 21, 2018 Ginger Hipszky
May 21, 2018 mary jo hajicek
May 21, 2018 ki paul
May 21, 2018 Brenda Garver
May 21, 2018 Mick Mars Cognitive Behavioral Therapy & Exposure therapy may be some new methods that might help
May 21, 2018 Janice Perry Our veterans deserve the best care. This isn't right that 22 veterans commit suicide every day. We must do something to help them.
May 21, 2018 Tina Miltner How horrible it must be to serve in combat that it causes so many Troops to take their own lives. The things they must see has to be beyond our imagination. I pray for our Troops and ask that we do anything necessary to help them!
May 21, 2018 Stacey MacLennan
May 21, 2018 Pat Loverink
May 21, 2018 Patricia Denton This is not acceptable. These are our heroes that have defended us and made it possible to live our lives. These numbers are our veterans, but remember, there are also civilian contractors that are fighting the same fight and feeling the same pain
May 21, 2018 Phyllis Harris
May 21, 2018 Anselmo Tadeo
May 21, 2018 Sarah Scheutzow
May 21, 2018 Terri Tadeo
May 21, 2018 Vicki Butler
May 21, 2018 Barb Morrison
May 21, 2018 Christina Ponder
May 21, 2018 Suzan McGlinch PLEASE HELP THE HOMELESS, especially our vets who risked everything for their country!!!!!
May 21, 2018 (Name not displayed) My Father, John F. Harrison was a MARINE in WWII, this Is A MOST SERIOUS Condition, that Can HELP Our "VETS"...Please go beyond the Extra Mile.They DID!!!! sending "PRAYERS"
May 21, 2018 (Name not displayed)
May 21, 2018 Pat Magilton Our veterans need desperately NEED HELP. Our government could care less what happens to them and that is WRONG.
May 21, 2018 Gail Hoage Please fight for this. Thank you.
May 21, 2018 Helen Breuler
May 21, 2018 Robin Peterson
May 21, 2018 F. MOREU
May 21, 2018 Angela Ramirez
May 21, 2018 Carol Fabitz
May 21, 2018 Tamiko Sawada
May 21, 2018 Joan Hutton
May 21, 2018 Naoma Hess
May 21, 2018 Betsy McCurry
May 21, 2018 Sandra Holbrook
May 21, 2018 Rhonda Spencer
May 21, 2018 Rose Ann Hayes PTSD comes in many different ways. Our soldiers deserve and need as many programs as they can get. PTSD is not a cookie cutter disease! Variations are needed for our servicemen and women. Make it happen!
May 21, 2018 Kaycee Clark
May 21, 2018 Jenifer Webb
May 21, 2018 (Name not displayed)
May 21, 2018 Toni DYGOWSKI
May 21, 2018 Lance Kammerud
May 21, 2018 Christine van Gemert
May 21, 2018 Lynne Atherton-Dat Dying on the battlefield isn't the only death. Sufficient therapy and mentoring are badly needed to prevent suicides. Have studies been done as to what is most effective in helping vets recover emotionally? Obviously what's being done now isn't working
May 21, 2018 Judy Carman
May 21, 2018 Lucy Sommer

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